hplyrikz:

Clear your mind here

hplyrikz:

Clear your mind here

the-chubby-nerd:

OH MY GOD

"I learned not to trust people; I learned not to believe what they say but to watch what they do; I learned to suspect that anyone and everyone is capable of ‘living a lie’. I came to believe that other people - even when you think you know them well - are ultimately unknowable."
Lynn Barber (via ohlovequotes)

enattendantlesoleil:

saying “that’s how things are” is incredibly useless when talking about social issues because yes, we are aware that that’s how things are, and we don’t like it, that’s the whole point

congratulations on providing no useful input to the conversation

stability:

you know when youre in the car and your parents break hard and they throw their arm over you for protection?
I have same instinct with my take out food

Living in New Zealand, you don’t get these experiences. I spent so much time in my room before. My life is so wild right now. For me to be able to do something I really enjoy and for that to get me out in the world—to South America, to here, to London—every day I kick myself, I’m so lucky.

shslscubadiver:

Gotta raise up that Gay-Point-Average

shslscubadiver:

Gotta raise up that Gay-Point-Average

angryplum:

shsl-pornstar:

man i wish homophobic people were actually AFRAID of gay people like could you imagine having the power to strike fear in peoples hearts with your homo

"If I do not have one trazillion dollars on my doorstep by noon tomorrow, I swear I will KISS THIS WOMAN on the MOUTH in front of your children.”

A message from noddytheornithopod
Something interesting I've noticed is that a lot of people are criticising how Capaldi's Doctor seems to have trouble believing things that he faces in episodes, even if he's seen more extraordinary things (it doesn't help that a Patrick Troughton story had "good Daleks" in it either, and then there's arguably the Dalek in "Dalek"). I'm just wondering, what is your take on this denialism? Is it annoying to you, or do you think it's actually a character trait?
A reply from joons

Oh, I definitely see it as a character trait that grows directly out of his experiences as Eleven. The Doctor sees himself in a much different light now—he no longer considers himself a good man but someone who has tricked countless people into believing in him, when he doesn’t think he has actually done anything to earn their trust. His last act as Eleven was a sacrificial one, moving out of the world in order to let life go on without him, and that self-deprecating tendency gets amplified as Twelve. His primary focus is not really whether good Daleks exist or whether Robin Hood was real, but what that means in a broader context. The question in “Robot of Sherwood” moves from is Robin Hood real to can heroes really exist without being created and mythologized? The Doctor sees himself that way, someone whose strengths have been greatly exaggerated, to the point where the harm he actually does gets brushed aside. And he’s constantly worried about that, so it’s easier to start out from a dubious, cynical perspective, because shattering the illusions that ultimately convince people to die for him is actually pretty important. Like, every episode is about him shrugging off his status as ~*THE DOCTOR*~, the opposite of a Hero Complex, and that crack in his confidence is so interesting. Of course, he’s still enormously egotistical, but he’s fine with that—he just doesn’t want to be anyone’s savior. 

"Mental illness is like fighting a war where the enemy’s strategy is to convince you that the war isn’t actually happening."
Kat  (via aranrhod)

brood-of-froods:

i like to think that hogwarts has a really strong wi-fi signal, but like the stair cases, it keeps moving around. just muggleborns, chillin on their laptops all suddenly stand up together, dash madly to a different corner of the school, and sit down wordlessly like some kind of mind hive flock of pigeons while the purebloods are just so confused